Phone: 519-744-2273 | Email: info@drdaigen.com

FAQ

Autumn Trees is a picture taken by Kitchener-Waterloo Psychologist (and amateur photographer) Dr. Val Daigen.

Frequently asked questions

What’s the difference between a psychologist and a psychiatrist?

Do I need a referral to see a psychologist?

Will you disclose information to my employer?

Are psychologists’ fees covered by OHIP?

My doctor has recommended that I get CBT. What is that, and do you do it?

Can I bring in my spouse (or parent or adult child)?

 

What’s the difference between a psychologist and a psychiatrist?

In Ontario, a psychologist has a doctoral degree (PhD or PsyD) in psychology.

Clinical psychologists such as myself are trained to conduct psychological assessments (administer psychological tests, interpret the results, and diagnose psychological disorders) and to provide psychotherapy, as well as to conduct psychological research.

In contrast, a psychiatrist is a medical doctor specializing in mental disorders. A psychiatrist can diagnose medical and mental disorders, prescribe medications, and conduct psychotherapy.

Individuals with disorders that require medication often consult a psychiatrist for a prescription while seeing a psychologist for psychotherapy.

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Do I need a referral to see a psychologist?

No. You can refer yourself to me with a phone call or an email message.

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Will you disclose information to my employer?

Not unless you give your written permission for me to do so. If you’re receiving disability benefits from a private insurance company or WSIB, however, I may need to provide information to them if you want to receive (or continue receiving) insurance benefits. I’ll discuss confidentiality issues with you in detail at our first meeting.

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Are psychologists’ fees covered by OHIP?

No. But psychologists’ fees are covered, to some extent, by most extended health care plans offered by employers.

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My doctor has recommended that I get CBT. What is that, and do you do it?

“CBT” stands for cognitive-behavioural therapy. This treatment is based on the belief that emotional problems are caused and maintained by errors in thinking. Treatment involves learning to identify and correct those errors, as well as learning new behaviours that produce more satisfying results than the old behaviours. I often incorporate aspects of this approach into my treatment plans.

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Can I bring in my spouse (or parent or adult child)?

I welcome contact with anyone who’s important in your life. I may be able to help a loved one understand your needs and how to help with your recovery. I treat only individual adults, however, so if you would like couple or family counselling, I’ll refer you to a practitioner who provides that service.

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